Commercial Property Leasing – Pain Points to Lease Negotiation

When leasing commercial or retail premises there are certain points of negotiation that always create pain for the parties concerned. Here are a few of the big and most common ones:

  1. The landlord wants a high starting rent
  2. The tenant wants a big incentive
  3. The tenant wants a huge option term for further potential occupancy
  4. The landlord wants a tenant but is not prepared to provide an incentive to attract them to the property
  5. The last tenant left the premises in a mess and the landlord will not fix it up until a new tenant is found
  6. The landlord will not refurbish the premises before they have a tenant on a signed lease
  7. The tenant does not want to give any form of guarantee as security in the case of any default of lease

These are the most common problems for the average lease negotiation. Most landlords also think that their property is better than anything else around and on that basis will not negotiate down on any rent to get the premises let. So often you hear that the landlord is prepared to wait it out and see what the next tenant will offer.

In this market there are limited numbers of active tenants looking to relocate to new premises. In some cases there can be 5 properties available for every tenant to choose from. Urgency in the lease deal is not high from the tenant’s perspective; landlords need to know this. They may only get one tenant to make an offer for the premises.

When it comes to leasing premises it is not where you start your lease and rent, but it is more important to know where you are headed and where you will finish. Rent reviews during the lease term can take care of rent escalation to improve the lease, providing the real estate agent negotiates the lease well.

So what can you do with this list of common leasing problems? The best way is to use the pain of the vacancy (in the case of the landlord), or the pain of the need for new premises (in the case of a tenant) to move the deal forward. You should work with the offer that you have and not hope that another will come again soon to replace a low offer today.

Take today’s lease offer and turn it into a valuable lease over the term. Show the landlord the real value of the lease by doing an analysis of the deal using a net present value approach on the lease cash flow over the lease term. It is remarkable how the landlord will soften their negotiation position when long term lease value is explained in numbers.

Commercial Property Leasing Activity Report – Your Complete and Foolproof Guide

When you manage or lease a commercial, industrial, or retail building you have to track the leasing issues, not only for the landlord, but also for the tenant. The performance of an investment property is impacted by rental and lease documentation in a variety of ways; you do not normally want a vacant property.

The Property Manager or Leasing Manager for the property has to keep things under control and on track to the property strategy, business plan, and tenancy mix.

To solve the problem it is best to run a leasing activity reporting process and update it at least monthly. Within each month the report becomes a moving tool to support the property investment for the landlord. It is a document that tracks:

  • Current lease activity
  • Forward lease changes
  • Vacancies

What you are normally looking to avoid here with the report is disruption to cash flow or something that disturbs the function of the property outside of any plans you may have. Accuracy in the report is paramount as it is likely to be the main document that keeps you abreast of critical lease issues. If there is an error in the report then you will likely miss a critical date on a lease, and that can be significant in the function of the property over the longer term for the landlord.

The leasing activity report is a forward looking report usually covering the next 12 months and everything that can happen to leases and licences therein. Special attention has to be given to anchor tenants, and tenancy mix strategies that are already in place; these strategies are already active and should be continued.

In a multi-tenant occupancy, the number of leases in the building can become daunting and diverse. When the landlord owns and operates a number of properties at the same time, the matter of lease stability is also complex. The leasing activity report keeps you on track.

A leasing activity report should include the following issues:

  1. A tenancy schedule of current leases including upcoming predicted or known changes such as rent reviews by type and timing, options for a further term, and expiry dates.
  2. Status of any current negotiations with tenants both new and established.
  3. Signed leases report (that is for existing leases for occupying tenants)
  4. Submitted leases report for documents that are outstanding for any reason
  5. Proposals for new leases pending a decision by the landlord or tenant
  6. Vacancy report of areas that are soon to be or are already vacant
  7. Marketing strategy and inspection feedback for vacant areas currently
  8. Prospects currently looking at the property and status
  9. List of vacant areas in competing properties nearby
  10. Changes to tenancy mix recommended
  11. Schedule of rentals in the current surrounding market to which you compete
  12. Overview of the types and level of incentive that exists in the surrounding market
  13. Target rentals and target lease terms
  14. Summary of recent leasing decisions made by the landlord in the last month that impact the property or any vacancy.

When you use these topics for your leasing report, it is clear for you to see that most things are covered and under control. In addition to the items above it is best to provide a time line graph of events both current and foreseen to help track events before they happen.

Commercial Property Leasing – Know These 4 Key Facts About Your Property Market

In commercial and retail real estate today the leasing process is critical to the income achieved by landlords and property investors. It is wise for a commercial real estate agent or broker to offer a comprehensive leasing service as part of specializing in Investment Property. There are plenty of lease deals to be done; it is just a matter of finding them.

Many times you will see market pressures on vacancy, lease occupancy, and rental levels entering into the lease negotiation between the tenant and a landlord. Make sure that you as the leasing agent have a total and comprehensive awareness of the prevailing market conditions and that you share that information directly with your client as the landlord. Prepare them for the real facts of a rental negotiation.

The landlord must be thoroughly briefed about the property market conditions prior to any negotiation with a tenant. Realistic rental levels together with appropriate lease terms and critical dates should apply to any lease negotiation in today’s business environment. Every lease negotiation becomes a strategy taking into account the conditions of the property and its improvements, the current vacancy levels, market rentals, and the requirements of investment performance.

Here are some tips to help you with understanding the property market today and the prevailing lease conditions:

  1. The levels of vacancy relating to your town or city and the property type will have an impact on incentives and market rents. Look at the potential for oversupply and understand how it may impact the future rentals and investment performance. New property developments coming into the market will shift the balance when it comes to vacant space and the quality of buildings offered for occupancy.
  2. Review the market rentals that apply within the property type and your location. Those rentals will need to be tracked and monitored for future lease negotiations and the conditioning of your clients when it comes to lease is under negotiation. Understand the impact and the relationships between market rentals, outgoings, and incentives.
  3. There are different rental strategies when it comes to outgoings recovery. In any new lease, there will be decisions to consider relating to outgoings recovery and therefore the setting of gross or net rental. Levels of market rental will apply in each case so you will need to understand the averages that apply to outgoings within the property type given your location, your town or your city.
  4. Talk to business owners and tenants regularly. Ask questions about lease occupancy and lease termination. You will soon find tenants considering property change due to the pressures of expansion or contraction within their business today. You can track all the tenants locally through specific processes of direct contact, database, cold calling, and door knocking. Every leasing agent should have a comprehensive awareness of the leasing intentions of every business within their territory. In understanding the leasing intentions of tenants locally, your professional leasing services become more valuable to the landlords of the area. That will then help you in closing more leasing opportunities and listings.

So these are some important factors to understand when it comes to leasing property locally. Take the time to connect with tenants in your market today and review the prevailing market conditions when it comes to rental, incentives, lease documentation, and property improvements. Track the enquiry rates coming to your office regularly so that you can profile tenant leasing requirements for today’s market.